A preload Question

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Pjkahut
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A preload Question

Post by Pjkahut »

does any one know the spring length in standard pre load :|
And how do you measure it, from where to where :?:


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Steve-TC1
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Re: A preload Question

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front is 13mm above the top of the fork cap nut [biggest nut] to the top of the preload adjuster [not rebound adjuster =brass screw ]
rear is 178.5mm with rear wheel of floor via jack under exhaust or rolled onto side stand with wheel up [not by rear paddock stand as there must be no load on rear suspension ]


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Re: A preload Question

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Thanks Torque ;)

when you messure the rear, what part of the suspension is it you meassure :o


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Re: A preload Question

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you measure The actual spring length from top of bottom collor [bellow spring ] to the bottom of lower top coller [above spring ]


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Re: A preload Question

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try this


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Pjkahut
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Re: A preload Question

Post by Pjkahut »

Thanks a mill

When you think about it it all makes sense: Spring length :roll:

Feel a bit stupid now, but it wont last long :lol:

The perfect thing to mess with on a wet day 8)


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Re: A preload Question

Post by Steve-TC1 »

don't forget preload is just that it doesn't alter spring stiffness [a 500lbs spring is still a 500lbs spring no matter how much you preload it ] ,
all it [preload]does is set the level of the bike i.e if your heavy and carry a passenger then your suspension would need preloading to make the bike sit higher so when you get on and your passenger the bike now sits at a height were feet and pegs wouldn't be touching down mid corner,
alwways leave some sag when setting preload [sag will be fine on std settings ]


preload and Setting the Sag:

First you need a fully extended measurement., best bet here is to make sure the front wheel actually leaves the ground. You can do this with a jack under the pipes or a couple of helpers.[front paddock stand won’t work as bikes weight is still on suspension , unless of course paddock stand has attachment for fitting under bottom yoke ] Measure the exposed area of the fork slider. this will be from the bottom of the bottom yoke [triple tree] to the top of the dust seal on the slider., Record this measurement on a sheet.
Lower the bike and Push down on the fork hard three times to settle the suspension. Now measure the same two points again. Subtract this number from the fully extended number to get your "bike sag" or "free sag" number. Finally, you get on the bike [feet up with some one holding the bike ]and push down three more times, while a friend balances the bike. Have your friend with the tape take the final measurement. Subtract that from the fully extended number to get your "rider sag". The measurement you are looking for on the front fork is 35mm. If your spring is of the correct rate, the static sag should be about sixty percent of the rider sag, or about 20mm. The front fork has to have a great deal of static sag so that the front wheel may move down into a hole as well as over a bump. too much sag, = turn the preload adjuster in [clockwise] and too little sag = turn adjuster out [anticlockwise]


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